ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic

The Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America

Fall Meeting Preview: The University of the Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Chapter will hold its fall meeting in Philadelphia on October 16, 2015. Several Philadelphia-area members will be posting profiles about their libraries and collections — watch this space and mark your calendars.

Established in 1876, the University of the Arts is one of the nation’s only universities dedicated solely to educating students in the visual, design, and performing arts. Nearly 1,900 students are enrolled in more than 40 undergraduate and graduate programs, and are taught by almost 500 full- and part-time faculty members on the University’s campus on Broad Street, Philadelphia’s Avenue of the Arts.

The University of the Arts evolved from two century-old institutions: the Philadelphia College of Art (PCA) and Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts (PCPA).

PMSIA purchased 320 South Broad Street in 1893 and has occupied this historic building ever since.

PMSIA purchased 320 South Broad Street in 1893.

PCA was established in 1876 as part of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Together, they were originally known as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (PMSIA), created in response to the growing interest in art and design education stirred by the country’s Centennial Exposition. In 1949, PCA changed its name to the Philadelphia Museum School of Art, reflecting expanded programs that trained artists in a variety of areas. The school received accreditation 1959, and in 1964 it separated from the Museum to become the Philadelphia College of Art.

The University today.

The University today.

The performing arts programs of the University of the Arts date back to 1870, when three graduates of Germany’s Leipzig Conservatory opened the Philadelphia Musical Academy, one of the first European-style conservatories of music in America. The Academy became an independent college of music in 1950, one of only eight institutions in the nation to offer four-year Bachelor of Music degrees. The school changed its name to the Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts (PCPA) in 1976. One year later, the Philadelphia Dance Academy (founded 1944) became part of PCPA and in 1983 the School of Theater was created, achieving the college’s ideal combination of dance, music and theater arts.

The Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1890 catalog cover.

The Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1890 catalog cover.

In 1985, PCA and PCPA merged to become the Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts. The granting of university status in 1987 brought about one more change, and the University of the Arts became the largest institution of its kind in the nation, offering programs in design, fine arts, media arts, crafts, music, dance and theater.

University Libraries

Supporting the mission of The University of the Arts, the University Libraries educates and inspires students to be effective researchers and critical users of information, and to apply those skills to their artistic, creative, and lifelong endeavors.

The Albert M. Greenfield Library, Music Library, and Visual Resources Collection comprise the University Libraries. The Albert M. Greenfield Library serves as the main library for the campus and contains materials in many formats on art and design, communication, dance, theater, film and television, multimedia, liberal arts, and other general subjects. The Greenfield Library houses the Libraries’ administrative offices, as well as the University Archives. The Archives contains materials documenting the University’s activities and history.

Albert M. Greenfield Library interior.

Albert M. Greenfield Library interior.

Left: UArts Greenfield Library entrance. Right: A student in the UArts Music Library.

Visual Resources and Special Collections (VRSC) provides image resources for teaching and study, and houses the Libraries’ Special Collections, with particular strengths in book arts and textiles, and also contains select collections of alumni work. The visual resources collections are made up of digital images and pictures of a variety of subjects with a focus on reproductions of artwork.

The Music Library, located in the Merriam Theater Building, is a specialized library serving academic programs and interests in music and musical theater. The Music Library contains listening facilities for recorded sound in addition to general reading areas and a music education resource area.

UArts Music Library social media photo.

UArts Music Library social media photo.

An institutional repository, UArts Digital Collections, is being developed to provide digital access to the University’s creative and scholarly output, and archival documents. The growing collections represent the history of the University of the Arts as well as the artistic and creative output of its students, faculty, and alumni.

The Libraries’ instructional program is supported by five librarians who also serve as liaisons to academic programs. The librarians provide in-class instruction as well as one-on-one and group sessions in the libraries. An online chat service accessible on the Libraries homepage is available for reference and other general questions.

Professor Harris Fogel's photography students with library books they selected.

Professor Harris Fogel’s photography students with library books they selected.

The University Libraries holdings include more than 129,000 books and bound periodicals, 19,000 music scores, 114,000 mounted and encapsulated pictures, 20,000 digital images, 21,000 items of recorded music in LP and CD formats, and 4,000 video materials in videocassette and DVD formats. Listening and viewing facilities, Internet and campus wireless access, and networked photocopiers for copying and scanning are available in addition to general reading facilities. The Libraries subscribe to more than 50 electronic reference tools both general and specific to the arts, including an ebook collection holding more than 120,000 multidisciplinary titles, as well as online periodical databases, encyclopedias, and streaming audio and video databases. The library maintains reciprocal use agreements with other nearby academic libraries.

 

News about services and collections can be found on the Libraries homepage and on the UArts Libraries Facebook page.

http://library.uarts.edu/
Facebook: www.facebook.com/UArtsLibraries
Instagram: https://instagram.com/uartslibraries/
Tumblr: http://uartslibraries.tumblr.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/uartslibraries

Vacancy Announcement: National Gallery of Art Library

The National Gallery of Art Library is seeking applicants for a student assistant position in the Reader Services Department.

Library Technician (Vertical Files/Non-Print Materials)

The primary purpose of the position is to assist with the maintenance, development, and consultation of the vertical files and non-print collections.

Duties include preparing newly acquired materials for the vertical files and non-print collections, preparing bibliographic records using an online catalog, and assisting with the organization and use of both collections by Gallery staff and outside readers.

Knowledge and Skills:
Applicants should have a basic knowledge of library collections and online catalogs, familiarity with using personal computers, an ability to type and file accurately, and an ability to work cooperatively with other staff members and library patrons. Reading knowledge of a Western European language (French, German, or Italian) is desirable.

Qualifications:
In order to qualify for this position, applicants must be registered at least as a half-time student, and be able to provide certification of student status, including a current class schedule. Work schedules will be determined to accommodate the student’s class schedule and the Library’s work requirements. The position is limited to 20 hours per week while classes are in session; full-time employment is available during semester and summer breaks. The incumbent earns sick and annual leave based on the amount of hours worked.

Interested applicants should send résumés and any inquiries by email to:

Lamia Doumato, Head of Reader Services
National Gallery of Art Library
email: l-doumato@nga.gov

New Finding Aids from ICFA, Dumbarton Oaks

The Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) of Dumbarton Oaks is pleased to announce the publication of four (4) new finding aids. These collections document various fieldwork and research projects, relating to Roman and Late Antique pavement mosaics, Byzantine sites in Greece and Turkey, and Coptic architectural sculpture from Oxyrhynchos.

New Finding Aids at ICFA, Dumbarton Oaks

To view the complete PDF finding aids, click on the thumbnail at the top of the following collection-level records in our online inventory, AtoM@DO. You can also check under the “Finding Aids” field for the direct links.

Since our last announcement of published finding aids in August 2014, ICFA staff have continued to work on processing our collections and improving the descriptive metadata in our finding aids in order to make our holdings more discoverable, usable, and accessible to our users. Currently, we are finalizing the processing of two other collections that were created by recognized Byzantine scholars: Corpus for Wall Mosaics in the North Adriatic Area, ca. 1974-1990s (MS.BZ.009) and the Ernst Kitzinger Research Papers and Photographs, 1940s-1980s (MS.BZ.016). We have also completed the digitization for William Earl Betsch Photographs of Architectural Capitals in Istanbul, 1970 (PH.BZ.002). The digital surrogates for Betsch’s negatives will also be added in AtoM@DO, and they will surely complement a related collection in ICFA, Nicholas V. Artamonoff Photographs of Istanbul and Turkey, 1935-1945 (PH.BZ.010). Thus, you can expect to see more and more content in AtoM@DO in the coming months – so stay tuned!

To learn more about these collections and ICFA’s current projects, please see: https://icfadumbartonoaks.wordpress.com/2015/08/05/new-finding-aids-from-icfa-2/.

Digital Humanities for Art Historians Mini-Workshop Resources

The following resources were compiled by Sarah Osborne Bender to support the Digital Humanities for Art Historians Mini-Workshop held at the ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Summer Meeting, July 24, 2015, in Norfolk, Virginia.

How to keep up with developments in DH:

How to engage with DH initiatives local to our chapter:

Tools for teaching:

Tools for research:

Examples:

Two accessible data tools:

A few words about cleaning or “tidying” your data:
When working with structured data, having clean or “tidy” data can make a big difference. Hadley Wickham’s article Tidy Data is an excellent introduction if you’re working with data in spreadsheets, especially surveys or values. You can also drop your spreadsheet into Open Refine. This extremely powerful tool is good for resolving erroneous variations in data, and many other things. Thomas Padilla, Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State created an excellent guide to getting started in Open Refine.

Where can you get data to experiment with?
You can get unstructured data, full text of articles or correspondence for example, from sites like Project Guttenberg, Hathi Trust, even JSTOR, or places like the Archives of American Art that have full texts of things like oral histories.

More institutions are opening up their collection data all the time. Just last week, MOMA released its collection data on Github, joining the Tate and the Cooper Hewitt.

Paid Fall 2015 Archives Internship at Glenstone

The Glenstone Museum Archives is now accepting applications for the Fall 2015 Project Archivist Intern.

Description

The Project Archivist Intern will be responsible for processing Glenstone’s backlog of analog and digital architectural records. Position responsibilities will include:

  • Identification of unique records, removing duplications
  • Creation of processing plan
  • Appraisal of records for long-term preservation
  • Arrange, describe, catalog, and house analog records
  • Organize digital architectural records
  • Answer reference questions from staff
  • Develop project reporting system
  • Other duties as assigned

Compensation

This is a part-time, temporary position of up to 24 hours per week, to be completed during the Fall 2015 semester. The rate of pay is $15 per hour stipend and/or academic credit in line with graduate school requirements.

Application Process

To apply, please submit a cover letter, resume, and a list of three professional references electronically through our Glenstone Jobs Portal. The deadline for applications is Friday, August 21, 2015.

Paid Fall 2015 Library Internship at Glenstone

The Glenstone Museum Library is now accepting applications for the Fall 2015 Library Collections Internship.

Description
The Library Collections Intern will be responsible for standardizing legacy library records in the art museum library’s new CMS database, CollectiveAccess. Position responsibilities will include:

  • Checking existent library records for accuracy
  • Adding Library of Congress Subject Headings, Getty vocabularies, call numbers, and images to library records
  • Creating intellectual relationships between library, artwork, and archival records
  • Applying call number labels and barcodes to library items
  • Shifting, shelving, and relocating materials as needed
  • Responding to reference requests from museum staff

Compensation
This is a part-time, temporary position of up to 30 hours per week, to be completed during the Fall 2015 semester. The rate of pay is $15 per hour stipend and/or academic credit in line with graduate school requirements.

Application Process
To apply, please submit a cover letter, resume, and a list of three professional references electronically through our Glenstone Jobs Portal. The deadline for applications is Friday, July 31, 2015.

MCN – ARLIS/NA Panel Call for Papers – DUE TOMORROW!

All,

As part of our work to promote ARLIS/NA and reach out to colleagues across disciplines we have been working with MCN (the Museum Computer Network) to put together an ARLIS/NA panel at their upcoming conference.

MCN is really excited to have proposals for an ARLIS/NA panel and specifically for talks from ARLIS/NA members that address the conference theme “The Invisible Architectures of Connected Museums”  from their own unique perspective.

Proposals are due SOON, this Thursday, April 30.

Here is a link to the call for proposals, and please do not hesitate to let me know if you have any questions.

http://mcn.edu/mcn-2015-minneapolis/mcn-2015-call-for-proposals/

Sincerely,

Kristen 

President, ARLIS/NA

Job Opportunity at Dumbarton Oaks: Part-Time Archival Assistant

The Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection (http://www.doaks.org/) in Washington, D.C. is seeking a part-time Archival Assistant to assist ICFA staff with archival processing and preservation projects of Byzantine collections and other administrative tasks. Under the supervision of the Archivist, the part-time Archival Assistant will assist with the assessment, arrangement, description, and preservation of Byzantine archival collections, which comprise administrative records and fieldwork materials produced or created by Byzantine scholars, archaeologists, and photographers.

For the full job description, please see: http://www.doaks.org/about/employment/part-time-archival-assistant-byzantine-collections. For more information about ICFA and its collections, please see: http://www.doaks.org/icfa or our blog: https://icfadumbartonoaks.wordpress.com/. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, resume or CV, contact information for three references, and a work sample (e.g., finding aid, online exhibit, blog, etc.) to HumanResources@doaks.org.

~Shalimar Abigail Fojas White, Manager, Image Collection and Fieldwork Archives, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Corcoran Artists’ Books Collection at GW Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Horse hair, glass, metal screws, handmade paper, a cotton t-shirt—these are just some of the materials that compose the nearly three hundred artists’ books housed in the Corcoran Artists’ Books Collection at GW Libraries. Conceived by renowned artists such as Ed Ruscha or by up-and-coming artists from the Corcoran’s MA Art and the Book program, these art objects stretch the boundaries of what ‘book’ can mean: Alice Austin’s Milk, Butter, Eggs (2004) resembles a codex, but when opened reveals its accordion folds with illustrations of domestic scenes; Beth Thielen’s The Tower (2007) appears largely sculptural until small booklets unfold from its architectural, watch-tower-like form.   Thielen’s work, made in collaboration with women prisoners from San Quentin State Prison and the California Rehabilitation Centers, embodies the collection’s thematic focus of social justice and consciousness.

Beth Thielen, The Tower (2007); Photo by William Atkins / The George Washington University

Along with this focus on social issues, the collection’s primary purpose is as a teaching collection for book arts students. Each year the Artists’ Books Committee (made up of Art and the Book professors and students, and a librarian) identifies particular social justice issues, like LGBTQ rights or xenophobia, on which to concentrate for new purchases. The committee also selects formal aspects (e.g. flag books or box housings) which will support student work. In addition, the collection contains collaborative works by Art and the Book graduate students such as +/- One Percent (2010), and most recently, An Exquisite Future (2014); these works are published by Corcoran’s in-house publisher, Marginalia Press.

The Corcoran Artists’ Books Collection was slowly amassed over the past several decades by the Corcoran Library at the former Corcoran College of Art + Design—now the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design within The George Washington University. With the acquisition of the Corcoran Library by GW Libraries in 2014, this unique collection was transferred to its new home in GW’s Special Collections Research Center where individual students and class groups can view selected books upon request.

Alice Austin, Milk, Butter, Eggs (2004); Photo by William Atkins / The George Washington University

Alice Austin, Milk, Butter, Eggs (2004); Photo by William Atkins / The George Washington University

Right now through March 20th, you can view a selection of nineteen artists’ books from the Corcoran collection at GW’s Luther W. Brady Gallery. The exhibit entitled “Paper Window” presents a wide range of artist book categories, including photobooks, pop-ups, mixed media books, and altered books. The exhibit also features customized book housings and book-making tools on loan from the Art and the Book graduate program. Visit often as paged books will periodically have new spreads on display. Located on the second floor of GW’s Media and Public Affairs Building (805 21st Street, NW), the Brady Gallery is free and open to the public.

Shira Loev Eller
Art and Design Librarian
Gelman Library
The George Washington University

Upgrade for AtoM@DO, Dumbarton Oaks ICFA’s online database

One year ago today, the Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) of Dumbarton Oaks launched our online database, AtoM@DO (atom.doaks.org). We are pleased to announce that we have upgraded to a new version (2.1) of the AtoM (Access to Memory) software, which features a redesigned interface and many enhancements for searching and browsing.

In response to feedback from our users, we sponsored development of new functionality within the Places taxonomy through AtoM lead developer Artefactual Systems. You can now browse a hierarchical list of geographic terms with a tree-view that allows you to navigate from broader terms to narrower terms. You can also browse an alphabetical list of places, or search within the taxonomy with a dedicated search box. A persistent Browse menu in the header gives you instant access to all of AtoM@DO’s taxonomies, whether Names, Places, or Subjects. These same access points are now prominently displayed at the top of all archival records, thereby facilitating discovery of related items.

AtoM@DO’s search engine has been enhanced with the implementation of Elasticsearch. Now, when you start a keyword search in the Search box located in the header, suggested matches will appear in real time, faceted by archival description, Names, Places, or Subjects. The search engine is responsive, so the more characters you type, more relevant results will appear dynamically. Additionally, Place terms assigned to archival descriptions will inherit their parent terms, so that searches for “Turkey” will automatically return results for “Istanbul.” AtoM@DO now includes more robust faceting of search results, so that you can narrow large sets quickly to target the most relevant results. Use the facet filters on the left-hand side of the search results page to limit your results by level of description, department, or creator, or by access points (Names, Places, and Subjects).

We hope that you will explore the new AtoM@DO, which contains many more enhancements that we hope will improve our users’ ability to locate archival materials at Dumbarton Oaks. We will continue to add content to AtoM@DO as we process and describe our collections. In the meantime, you can also discover our collections (processed and unprocessed) through a variety of channels, whether HOLLIS, WorldCat, or ArchiveGrid.

For more information on how to use the new features, please see the AtoM@DO FAQ page prepared by ICFA staff. Feel free contact us with any questions or feedback at icfa@doaks.org. We would especially like to thank our colleague, Prathmesh Mengane, Database and CMS Developer, whose dogged assistance made this upgrade possible.

~Shalimar Abigail Fojas White, Manager, Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

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